Our Market Research (2019)

In late 2018, the freebowler Australia team finalised some market research conducted with cricket clubs throughout the country in relation to bowling  machines which are used as coaching and training aids. The results and summary of the research is included below.

ANALYSIS: This question in relation to what types of balls may seemed as though it was skewed towards our product, but we put it in there because there are indeed limitations of using real balls in a bowling machine such as the durability of machine balls and costs/scarcity associated with real balls. 

With that said, it was very positive for our team to see that 75% of respondents expressed a preference towards using real balls in a bowling machine.

 

ANALYSIS: Based on the current price range of freebowler (AUD$825 to AUD$899 - depending on freight option), it was encouraging to learn that 44% of clubs would expect to pay within this price bracket. 

It was also interesting to note that 30% had expectations of paying between $1,000 to $2,000+ for a bowling machine that throws down real balls.

 

NB: The answers to this question was unstructured and the responses are below.

  • $10 per person
  • $20 per person
  • $500 in total
  • "Most members would contribute"
  • Unsure
  • $20 per person
  • Unsure
  • Unsure
  • Unsure
  • $50 per person
  • $200 in total
  • $20 - $40 per person
  • "Not applicable because the club would pay for it"
  • "Not much because we'd look to get a grant"
  • $20 - $40 per person
  • $500 in total
  • $5 per person
  • $250 in total
  • $100 per person
  • $50 per person
  • Unsure
  • $300 in total
  • $2,000 in total
  • None
  • None
  • $10 per person
  • $10 per person
  • "Probably under $200"
  • None
  • $10 per person
  • "Not sure. Never experienced this type of way of funding"
  • $20 per person
  • "Very little"
  • $100 per person
  • Unsure
  • $2000 in total
  • $500 in total
  • Unsure
  • $5 - $50 per person
  • Unsure
  • "Not much - I'd expect the club to pay"
  • $20 per person
  • "We'd run the campaign using social media"
  • "It would be hard to get people to chip in"
  • $1000 in total
  • $10 per person
  • Sponsors would pay
  • None
  • $50 per person
  • $500 in total

 

ANALYSIS: The context for this question was in relation to testing a concept which would allow cricket clubs to finance the cost of purchasing a freebowler machine.  Based on feedback received through Australia, India and other parts of the world, cricket clubs generally believe that the product is affordable, but it's also been identified by some clubs as an expense that hadn't been budgeted for - therefore it's been a challenge for some small-medium sized clubs to make an instant purchase, with many putting it in the budget for next cricket season OR waiting for grants. 

Using the "many hands make light work" ethos, the freebowler Australia team has built a mechanism for clubs to set up Kickstarter-like campaigns for members to help make the purchase and this question was designed to gauge the response.  Out of the 28 respondents who provided dollar amounts, the average estimated "pledge" per person was $31 (21 amounts provided) and $716 (9 amounts provided) per club.  With Luke Simmons (freebowler Australia Country Manager) having been involved in cricket club committees throughout Australia and the UK, he's aware that many players/members will expect that these sorts of expenses are paid through yearly subs - unless the topic was broached carefully.

FINAL THOUGHTS

The entire freebowler team (Internationally) are fully aware that we're holding a place as innovators within the market offering the world's 1st portable and non-electric bowling machine that sends down real cricket balls.

While it's great to know that our product seems to be priced competitively, we're more than happy to further push the envelope and identify new ways that clubs, where applicable, can take the cost of the product out of the equation and get it in the hands of their cricketers (to help everyone at the club smash bowlers around the park as they should!).

For any enquiries about this research or to become involved in a fundraising campaign, please contact Luke Simmons via luke@freebowler.com.